GOLF CARTS; LOCAL ROADS S.B. 771 (S-1):

SUMMARY OF BILL

REPORTED FROM COMMITTEE

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senate Bill 771 (Substitute S-1 as reported)

Sponsor: Senator Kevin Hertel

Committee: Local Government

 


CONTENT

 

The bill would amend the Michigan Vehicle Code to increase, from 30,000 to 65,000, the population threshold at which a city, village, or township could not allow for the operation of golf carts on its streets. The bill also would specify that the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) could only authorize a legislative body of a local unit of government to adopt an ordinance authorizing the operation of golf carts on a State trunk line highway, other than an interstate, located within the local unit of government if the local unit of government had a population of 30,000 individuals or less based on the most recent census.[1]

 

MCL 257.657a

 

BRIEF RATIONALE

 

St. Clair Shores, Michigan, borders communities that are authorized to drive golf carts on public roads but has a population greater than 30,000 and so may not authorize golf carts on its roads. According to testimony, St. Clair Shores also contains a large marina district called the Nautical Mile through which people with golf carts like to drive; however, knowing it is illegal to drive on the Nautical Mile's roads they drive down sidewalks and endanger pedestrians. To promote safety, the bill should be passed so communities like St. Clair Shores could authorize golf carts to drive on select roads instead of sidewalks.

 

Legislative Analyst: Alex Krabill

 

FISCAL IMPACT

 

The bill would have a negative fiscal impact on the State and local units of government. It would increase the number of cities and villages that can allow golf carts on streets. This could reduce vehicle registrations and gasoline tax if people use a golf cart to travel rather than a car or truck which would result in less money for MDOT and local units of government.

 

Date Completed: 6-13-24 Fiscal Analyst: Bobby Canell

 

 

 

This analysis was prepared by nonpartisan Senate staff for use by the Senate in its deliberations and does not constitute an official statement of legislative intent.

 



[1] Michigan's State trunkline highway system is the network of roads posted with Interstate-, US-, or M-numbered route designations. The system is the responsibility of MDOT.