No. 24

STATE OF MICHIGAN

Journal of the Senate

102nd Legislature

REGULAR SESSION OF 2024

 

 

 

 

 

Senate Chamber, Lansing, Thursday, March 7, 2024.

 

10:00 a.m.

 

 

The Senate was called to order by the Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Erika Geiss.

 

The roll was called by the Secretary of the Senate, who announced that a quorum was present.

 

 

Albert用resent Hauck用resent Moss容xcused

Anthony容xcused Hertel用resent Nesbitt用resent

Bayer用resent Hoitenga容xcused Outman用resent

Bellino用resent Huizenga用resent Polehanki用resent

Brinks用resent Irwin用resent Runestad容xcused

Bumstead容xcused Johnson用resent Santana用resent

Camilleri用resent Klinefelt用resent Shink用resent

Cavanagh用resent Lauwers用resent Singh用resent

Chang用resent Lindsey用resent Theis容xcused

Cherry用resent McBroom容xcused Victory容xcused

Daley用resent McCann用resent Webber用resent

Damoose用resent McDonald Rivet用resent Wojno用resent

Geiss用resent McMorrow用resent


 

Senator Paul Wojno of the 10th District offered the following invocation:

Dear Lord, we ask for Your guidance with our legislative affairs this morning. Bless our Governor, Lieutenant Governor, those who are elected to serve, and all those who work here that provide assistance to us and the citizens of our state. You have ordained government that we may live in harmony with each other as You have given us this great state as our heritage to govern. We thank You for this generosity and entrusting us with such a high level of legislative responsibility. We ask for Your guidance as we work together for the best interest of our communities.

Bless our health care providers, first responders, educators, and everyone who serve others before themselves. May You provide comfort to those who are sick, those who have lost loved ones, and those who have faced persecution because of race, ethnicity, or orientation. We ask that You guide this Senate in productivity, respect for one another, and agreement in providing safety and security for the citizens of our state. Amen.

 

The Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Geiss, led the members of the Senate in recital of the Pledge of Allegiance.

 

 

Motions and Communications

 

 

Senator Lauwers moved that Senators Bumstead, Hoitenga, McBroom, Runestad, Theis and Victory be excused from today痴 session.

The motion prevailed.

 

Senator Singh moved that Senators Anthony and Moss be excused from today痴 session.

The motion prevailed.

 

By unanimous consent the Senate proceeded to the order of

Introduction and Referral of Bills

 

 

Senator McDonald Rivet introduced

Senate Bill No. 745, entitled

A bill to provide for a capital outlay program and for certain state departments; to implement the program in the budgetary process; to make appropriations for planning and construction at state institutions and the acquisition of land; to provide for the elimination of fire hazards at the institutions; to provide for special maintenance, remodeling, renovation, or demolition of structures and additions to projects at state institutions; to provide for elimination of occupational safety and health hazards at state agencies and institutions; to provide for the awarding of contracts; and to provide for the expenditure of appropriations under the supervision of the director of the department of technology, management, and budget and the state administrative board.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Anthony introduced

Senate Bill No. 746, entitled

A bill to amend 1979 PA 94, entitled 典he state school aid act of 1979, by amending sections 11, 17b, 201, 206, 236, and 241 (MCL 388.1611, 388.1617b, 388.1801, 388.1806, 388.1836, and 388.1841), sections 11, 201, and 236 as amended by 2023 PA 320, section 17b as amended by 2007 PA 137, and sections 206 and 241 as amended by 2023 PA 103.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Anthony introduced

Senate Bill No. 747, entitled

A bill to make, supplement, adjust, and consolidate appropriations for various state departments and agencies, the judicial branch, and the legislative branch for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; to provide for certain conditions on appropriations; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

Senator Anthony introduced

Senate Bill No. 748, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of lifelong education, advancement, and potential for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Anthony introduced

Senate Bill No. 749, entitled

A bill to make, supplement, and adjust appropriations for various state departments and agencies, the judicial branch, and the legislative branch for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2024; to provide for certain conditions on appropriations; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Anthony introduced

Senate Bill No. 750, entitled

A bill to make, supplement, and adjust appropriations for various state departments and agencies, the judicial branch, and the legislative branch for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; to provide for certain conditions on appropriations; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Camilleri introduced

Senate Bill No. 751, entitled

A bill to amend 1979 PA 94, entitled 典he state school aid act of 1979, by amending sections 11 and 17b (MCL 388.1611 and 388.1617b), section 11 as amended by 2023 PA 320 and section 17b as amended by 2007 PA 137.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator McCann introduced

Senate Bill No. 752, entitled

A bill to amend 1979 PA 94, entitled 典he state school aid act of 1979, by amending sections 236 and 241 (MCL 388.1836 and 388.1841), section 236 as amended by 2023 PA 320 and section 241 as amended by 2023 PA 103.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator McCann introduced

Senate Bill No. 753, entitled

A bill to amend 1979 PA 94, entitled 典he state school aid act of 1979, by amending sections 201 and 206 (MCL 388.1801 and 388.1806), section 201 as amended by 2023 PA 320 and section 206 as amended by 2023 PA 103.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator McCann introduced

Senate Bill No. 754, entitled

A bill to make, supplement, and adjust appropriations for various state departments and agencies, the judicial branch, and the legislative branch for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2024; to provide for certain conditions on appropriations; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator McCann introduced

Senate Bill No. 755, entitled

A bill to make, supplement, and adjust appropriations for various state departments and agencies, the judicial branch, and the legislative branch for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; to provide for certain conditions on appropriations; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

Senator Shink introduced

Senate Bill No. 756, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of corrections for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Shink introduced

Senate Bill No. 757, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the judiciary for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Cherry introduced

Senate Bill No. 758, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of agriculture and rural development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Cherry introduced

Senate Bill No. 759, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of natural resources for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Cherry introduced

Senate Bill No. 760, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the legislature, the executive, the department of the attorney general, the department of state, the department of treasury, the department of technology, management, and budget, the department of civil rights, and certain other state purposes for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations; to provide for the disposition of fees and other income received by the state agencies; and to declare the effect of this act.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Klinefelt introduced

Senate Bill No. 761, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the state transportation department for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Hertel introduced

Senate Bill No. 762, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of military and veterans affairs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Hertel introduced

Senate Bill No. 763, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of state police for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

Senator Cavanagh introduced

Senate Bill No. 764, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of licensing and regulatory affairs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Cavanagh introduced

Senate Bill No. 765, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of insurance and financial services for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Cavanagh introduced

Senate Bill No. 766, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of labor and economic opportunity for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Santana introduced

Senate Bill No. 767, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of health and human services for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Irwin introduced

Senate Bill No. 768, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of environment, Great Lakes, and energy for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senator Bayer introduced

Senate Bill No. 769, entitled

A bill to make appropriations for the department of education for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2025; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senators Albert and Bellino introduced

Senate Bill No. 770, entitled

A bill to provide for the elimination of daylight saving time in this state; and to provide for a referendum.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

 

 

Senator Hertel introduced

Senate Bill No. 771, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled 溺ichigan vehicle code, by amending section 657a (MCL 257.657a), as amended by 2018 PA 139.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Local Government.

 

 

Senators Shink and Bayer introduced

Senate Bill No. 772, entitled

A bill to amend 2008 PA 295, entitled 鼎lean and renewable energy and energy waste reduction act, (MCL 460.1001 to 460.1211) by adding part 8.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Energy and Environment.

Senators Shink and Bayer introduced

Senate Bill No. 773, entitled

A bill to amend 2008 PA 295, entitled 鼎lean and renewable energy and energy waste reduction act, (MCL 460.1001 to 460.1211) by adding part 8.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Energy and Environment.

 

 

House Bill No. 4924, entitled

A bill to amend 1961 PA 236, entitled 迭evised judicature act of 1961, by amending section 3304 (MCL 600.3304) and by adding chapter 34.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Civil Rights, Judiciary, and Public Safety.

 

 

Recess

 

 

Senator Singh moved that the Senate recess subject to the call of the Chair.

The motion prevailed, the time being 10:16 a.m.

 

10:30 a.m.

 

The Senate was called to order by the Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Geiss.

 

 

Senator Klinefelt asked and was granted unanimous consent to make a statement and moved that the statement be printed in the Journal.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Klinefelt痴 statement is as follows:

Today it is my pleasure to recognize Scott Merchant for his service to the Chippewa Valley High School community as he moves on to his new role as head coach of the Lawrence Tech Blue Devils football team. We salute him for his success on the field and his effort to mentor young athletes across metro Detroit. He was named head coach of the Chippewa Valley Big Reds football team in 2009, and he earned accolades and guided his team to success. During his time with the Big Reds football program, he led the team to achieve the 2018 Division 1 State Championship, three MAC Red championships, four district championships, and a regional championship. As a testament to his abilities, his final record includes 104 gameday wins, and the Big Reds have not missed a playoff since 2011.

Beyond the football field, Scott has made a positive difference in metro Detroit and Michigan by raising money to fund cancer research through the Van Andel Institute and to support our veterans through the Wounded Warrior Project. He has been recognized for his efforts with the Steve Spicer Memorial Team Leadership Award by the Michigan High School Football Coaches Association. Scott is a shining example of volunteerism and community building within the state.

 

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

General Orders

 

 

Senator Singh moved that the Senate resolve itself into the Committee of the Whole for consideration of the General Orders calendar.

The motion prevailed, and the Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Geiss, designated Senator Shink as Chairperson.

After some time spent therein, the Committee arose; and the Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Geiss, having resumed the Chair, the Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 567, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled 典he revised school code, by amending section 1280f (MCL 380.1280f), as amended by 2023 PA 7.

Substitute (S-2).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 568, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled 典he revised school code, (MCL 380.1 to 380.1852) by adding section 1531e.

Substitute (S-2).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

 

By unanimous consent the Senate proceeded to the order of

Statements

 

 

Senators Polehanki, Albert, Bayer and Irwin asked and were granted unanimous consent to make statements and moved that the statements be printed in the Journal.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Polehanki痴 statement is as follows:

Madam President, just yesterday a Republican State Representative in the Michigan House held a press conference and announced a resolution to censure Michigan痴 first Black Speaker for being racist because the Speaker supported minority-owned small business funding in last year痴 budget. The Republican Representative compared this to the Jim Crow-era whites-only drinking fountains. It was disgusting and that痴 why I have risen to speak today.

Madam President, this isn稚 the first time that my Republican colleagues have tried to pervert the meaning of racism to confuse and feed their base. A Republican colleague in this chamber has written on social media that Democrats are vile scumbags who are the party of racism. They say we池e racist, Madam President, because we acknowledge race in some of our caucuses, our policies, and our budgets. In the Michigan Legislature, Democrats have a Latino caucus, a Black caucus, an Asian Pacific American caucus. We made Juneteenth a holiday and, yes, we created a grant opportunity for minority-owned business owners and will continue to do so until racism in America is over. We made progress as a country but we池e not there yet. You see, my Republican colleagues know that in order to claim that Democrats are the real racists, they have to pretend that racism is over. They壇 say racism is over, so we don稚 need a critical theory on race. They壇 say racism is over, so we don稚 need education on diversity, equity, and inclusion. They壇 say racism is over, so we don稚 need to give minority-owned business owners a leg up in the budget.

Madam President, racism isn稚 over. We have at least one Republican governor trying to rewrite some hard truths about American history and turn it all into happy history. We have a now-former Republican presidential candidate afraid to say the Civil War was fought over slavery because it would tank her poll numbers. We have 81 percent of Republican primary voters saying in a poll they agree with Trump that immigrants are窯uote用oisoning the blood of our country. We have American Nazis marching in Nashville and we have a Republican member of the Michigan House amplifying the white supremacist great replacement theory which played a part in the mass murder of ten Black Americans who were trying to go grocery shopping. Why don稚 these legislators ask Americans of color if racism is over? I think they値l tell you.

Madam President, Democrats still see and acknowledge race because the United States of America is not yet post-racial. That痴 why we can稚 do color-blind politics in America right now. That痴 why learning about diversity, equity, and inclusion practices; having meaningful discussions about systemic racism; and creating equitable budgets are still needed, and that痴 why we do what we do. Democrats believe in a more perfect union, but we can稚 kid ourselves that racism no longer exists. We致e got more work to do as a country and that work will happen in our classrooms, our boardrooms, our lecture halls, and right here in the Michigan State Capitol.

 

Senator Albert痴 statement is as follows:

I have a very important and time-sensitive proposal to discuss today. The clock is literally ticking here. Of course, it痴 early March so this pressing issue could be none other than the rapidly-approaching time change. In case you missed it, daylight saving time begins this weekend.

This week I introduced Senate Bill No. 770, which would place on the November ballot the question of staying on standard time or springing ahead for daylight saving time. Before introducing this bill, I spent some time looking at the genesis of daylight saving time in researching whether or not the time change has been successful in accomplishing anything. In 1918, daylight saving time was adopted through the Standard Time Act. This bill was enacted primarily because Germany had undertaken a similar measure supposing it would save energy. This was not a proven hypothesis. Once the war ended, it became clear Americans wanted to get back to standard time, twice. Congress sent President Woodrow Wilson a bill to repeal daylight saving time, and twice he vetoed it. A second time, the repeal became law through a congressional override and national daylight saving time ended. Clearly, even from the beginning daylight saving time was a contentious issue.

For the next 23 years, the federal government stayed out of the time-change business, but that ended in early 1942. Then-President Franklin Roosevelt implemented what he coined 展ar Time, which was a permanent, year-round daylight saving time. Again, Americans were dissatisfied with this policy and 展ar Time was repealed shortly after the conclusion of World War II in 1945.

Finally in 1966, the Uniform Time Act was signed into law and it established a national daylight saving time, but it did reserve the ability for individual states to exempt themselves. It is worth noting, in January 1974, during the energy crisis, a permanent daylight saving time was again implemented in what originally seemed to be a popular move. However, in short order the American public quickly turned sour to the change. It was just too dark for too long in the morning. By the end of the year, the initiative was scrapped. In the fall, Americans started turning their clocks back to standard time. Once the Uniform Time Act was in place, the state of Michigan put this issue up to a vote of the people both in 1968 and 1972. Both votes were relatively close margins. At first daylight saving time was rejected, but it subsequently passed.

Throughout history, the primary justification of supporting daylight saving time has been to save energy. Well, what does the evidence show? How much energy are we saving? Good luck finding a definitive answer to that question, at best you will find mixed results. Some will show energy savings but will have all sorts of caveats, other research shows results that are inclusive or contradictory. Energy savings aside, we also need to factor other consideration on how this policy impacts our daily lives. A University of Michigan study from 2014 found a 24 percent jump in the number of heart attacks on the Monday after the spring forward for daylight saving time. Loss of sleep and an interruption of the body痴 natural rhythm may be to blame. Other experts have written about negative health effects for teens facing sleep deprivation worsened by the spring time change. And the list could go on.

So now here we are. It痴 over 100 years since we first adopted daylight saving time, and we find ourselves asking the question, Why are we doing this? I for one cannot find a valid reason, and I致e seen the time change both ways. When I was deployed to Iraq, I experienced what it was like to remain on standard time while everyone else back home changed their clocks. I was fascinated to learn that keeping the clocks constant did not result in the world coming to an end, an annoying disruption was removed, and it became apparent that remaining on standard time was more practical and reasonable. But no matter your feelings, daylight saving time is an issue that affects every Michigander in some way. After 52 years, it痴 time to bring this issue back to a vote to the people of Michigan. I know how I would vote.

 

Senator Bayer痴 statement is as follows:

I rise today in recognition of International Women痴 Day. March 8 is a globally-recognized day on which we uplift women, celebrate accomplishments, and put a spotlight on some of the issues faced by women around the world. The theme for this year is, 的nvest in women: Accelerate progress. We know that investing in women is vital to creating and maintaining a thriving economy and society. We致e seen throughout history what happens when you invest in women.

Women make up an enormous part of our workforce. We are small business owners, CEOs, farmers, caregivers, engineers, elected officials, and so much more. My own company was built with the help of many people and organizations who invested in me, including our own MEDC. With that investment, we were able to reach many more customers, build up our business, grew our impact through the work of our customers耀chools, mental health providers, family service agencies, and more. Over the last 100 years, women have entered the workforce in record numbers. We continue to climb the ladder, break that glass ceiling, bring home the bacon, and every other clich, and our economy and our society are better for it.

But there is much work still to be done. Around the world, women are still disproportionately affected by poverty, face discrimination in the workforce, and are at risk for exploitation. In fact, according to the UN, if the current trends continue more than 342 million women and girls will be living in extreme poverty by 2030. This is unacceptable, and it is avoidable. Sadly we also know that women face much more than poverty. There are global conflicts currently devastating communities, human rights violations, threats of violence, and a list that goes on and on. This is why we must continue to fight for women and invest in women預nd women entrepreneurs.

I知 proud of the steps we致e taken in the last year right here in Michigan to invest in women, from defending bodily autonomy, protecting our LGBTQ+ community, expanding the earned income tax credit, we are stepping up to do more for women in our state and continue to show up each and every day here for Michigan痴 women. I hope you値l join me in celebrating International Women痴 Day and, my colleagues, let痴 be proud of what we致e done and be ready to do more.

Senator Irwin痴 statement is as follows:

I wanted to take this rare and special opportunity to rise and agree wholeheartedly with my colleague from the 18th District. Daylight saving time is an anachronistic and damaging policy that was once upon a time developed to save energy, but at this time it probably wastes a little bit of energy. It doesn稚 just waste a little bit of energy and fail to meet its original objectives, it also causes car accidents, workplace accidents, and it also causes an unnecessary level of crankiness that none of us like to deal with, especially when you have small children. That痴 why people with small children and farmers have always been against this, because of course the cows and the little people don稚 know what time we池e pretending it is today when it痴 different than the time we were pretending it was yesterday. So it痴 all very silly. I agree we should change it.

I did want to remark though that one of the things that has been a struggle for us in changing this for many, many years is that there are different types of people in this world. Maybe because I waited tables for so long, I致e always been sort of a night person. So I致e always liked sticking with daylight saving time. Let痴 stick with the summer schedule. We get our evening restaurant opportunities, maybe enjoy a concert, the golf industry certainly loves it, and much more time to enjoy the beautiful outdoors here in Michigan in the evenings. Other people though, including all of our sleep scientists, feel strongly that we need to be on standard time. And I値l tell you what I feel strongly about, I feel strongly that those of us who are arguing about permanent standard and permanent daylight time are preventing the progress we need to overcome those folks who want to stick with this silly clock setting dance that we do twice a year.

 

 

Announcements of Printing and Enrollment

 

 

The Secretary announced that the following House bill was received in the Senate and filed on Wednesday, March 6:

House Bill No. 4924

 

The Secretary announced that the following bills were printed and filed on Wednesday, March 6, and are available on the Michigan Legislature website:

Senate Bill Nos. 740 741 742 743 744

House Bill Nos. 5548 5549 5550 5551 5552 5553

 

 

Committee Reports

 

 

The Committee on Finance, Insurance, and Consumer Protection reported

Senate Bill No. 632, entitled

A bill to amend 2005 PA 244, entitled 泥eferred presentment service transactions act, by amending section 33 (MCL 487.2153).

With the recommendation that the bill pass.

Mary Cavanagh

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Cavanagh, Irwin, McCann, Bayer, Camilleri and Huizenga

Nays: Senator Theis

The bill was referred to the Committee of the Whole.

 

 

The Committee on Finance, Insurance, and Consumer Protection reported

House Bill No. 4343, entitled

A bill to amend 2005 PA 244, entitled 泥eferred presentment service transactions act, by amending section 51 (MCL 487.2171).

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

Mary Cavanagh

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Cavanagh, Irwin, McCann, Bayer, Camilleri, Huizenga, Theis and Daley

Nays: None

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Committee on Finance, Insurance, and Consumer Protection submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, March 6, 2024, at 12:30 p.m., Room 1200, Binsfeld Office Building

Present: Senators Cavanagh (C), Irwin, McCann, Bayer, Camilleri, Huizenga, Theis and Daley

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Committee on Oversight submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, March 6, 2024, at 9:00 a.m., Room 1200, Binsfeld Office Building

Present: Senators Singh (C), McMorrow, Polehanki and McBroom

Excused: Senators Geiss and Lindsey

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Appropriations Subcommittee on Universities and Community Colleges submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, March 6, 2024, at 8:45 a.m., Room 1100, Binsfeld Office Building

Present: Senators McCann (C), Irwin, Singh, Albert and Damoose

 

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Committee on Appropriations submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, March 6, 2024, at 2:00 p.m., Harry T. Gast Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building

Present: Senators Anthony (C), McCann, McDonald Rivet, Cherry, Bayer, Santana, Shink, Irwin, Hertel, Camilleri, Klinefelt, McMorrow, Cavanagh, Bumstead, Albert, Damoose, Huizenga, Outman and Theis

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Appropriations Subcommittee on General Government submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, March 6, 2024, at 3:00 p.m., Room 1300, Binsfeld Office Building

Present: Senators Cherry (C), Bayer, Klinefelt, Albert and Hauck

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Appropriations Subcommittee on LEO/MEDC submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, March 6, 2024, at 3:00 p.m., Room 1200, Binsfeld Office Building

Present: Senators Cavanagh (C), McDonald Rivet, McCann, McMorrow, Camilleri, Huizenga and Bumstead

 

 

Scheduled Meetings

 

 

Appropriations

 

Subcommittee

 

Military, Veterans, State Police Tuesday, March 12, 9:00 a.m., Harry T. Gast Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (517) 373-2768

Senator Singh moved that the Senate adjourn.

The motion prevailed, the time being 10:54 a.m.

 

The Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Geiss, declared the Senate adjourned until Tuesday, March 12, 2024, at 10:00 a.m.

 

 

DANIEL OBERLIN

Secretary of the Senate